Is annual Sexual Harassment training required?

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Answer:    Although the EEOC does not require that employers conduct annual Sexual Harassment training; however, they do recommend it.    Take a look at the following stats and it becomes obvious why that would be a great idea.   The Weston Group can facilitate this training and also help with investigations in the work place.

 

  • The EEOC filed 50% more sexual harassment lawsuits in Fiscal Year 2018 than it did in Fiscal Year 2017.
  • Charges filed with the EEOC alleging sexual harassment increased by more than 12% from 2017.
  • For charges alleging harassment, reasonable cause findings increased to nearly 1,200 in 2018 compared to 970 in 2017. Successful conciliation’s (agreements reached without a lawsuit) were up to nearly 500 from 348 in 2017.
  • The EEOC recovered nearly 50% more for victims of sexual harassment through administrative enforcement and litigation in 2018; $70 million, up from $47.5 million in 2017.

How long should we keep employee timecards?

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Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, you are required to keep such records for at least three years from time of creation. However, we recommend that personnel records, including payroll records and timecards, be kept for seven years from the date the record is made or the date of termination, whichever is longer. That way, if you are subject to an IRS audit (which could go back seven years), you have this supporting documentation available upon request.

If you’re currently using a paper timekeeping system and you don’t want to store that much paper around the office for seven years, you can scan paper documents for electronic storage. Just make sure you have a reliable and secure method for storing this sensitive information and are able to access it as needed.

Return to Work

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Summary:

An employee injured off the job would like to return to work, but we’re concerned about her safety and her ability to do the job. How should we proceed? We’re a small employer and not subject to the Family and Medical Leave Act.

Question:   

What does an employer need to do if an employee is injured off the job and would like to return to work? The employer is concerned about her safety and ability to do the job? (This employer is under 50 employees so is not subject to Family and Medical Leave Act).

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